Westmorland Villages

Cliburn Index

Cliburn - Hall


The manor was formerly divided into two moieties - Cliburn Talebois and Cliburn Hervey. The former was held in the reign of Henry V. by the family of Tallibois, probably a branch of the baronial family at Kendal. Cliburn Hervey in the reign of Edward III. was in possession of the family of Cliburn. Robert Cliburn probably built the keep or tower, which forms the central part of the manor house, in the reigns of Edward III. or Richard II. The building bears date 1567, but the date is most likely that of the enlargement of the dwelling by Richard Cliburn, who inserted the stone bearing a shield, with inscription underneath, in Old English characters:

Thomas, son of this said Richard married Frances, youngest daughter of the famous Sir Richard Lowther, who succeeded Lord Scrope as Lord Warden of the Marches, in Elizabeth's reign. With this Thomas Cliburn ended the line of Cliburns of Cliburn Hall, and the manor passed into the family of Lowther.

The hall is on the bank of and above the River Leith, which runs into the Lyvennet at Cliburn Mill. Within a short distance of the hall, on the west, is St. Cuthbert's cChurch, a very ancient structure, in the north wall of the chancel of which is a charming little Norman window.

In feudal times the manorial lands of Cliburn would form a kind of oasis in the wastes, surrounded by Strickland common, Cliburn Ling, and Whinfell Forest. A younger son of Cliburn went over to Ireland and settled at Ballycullatan, in Tipperary, having received wholesale grants of lands arising out of the confiscations in Elizabeth's reign, and he afterwards became Receiver-General in Ireland for the Government.

Morland and Newby also possess old halls which date back to the 17th century, which are now used as farm residences.


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Westmorland Villages

Cliburn Index